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, and that company is involved with bribing foreign officials, that being detectives at scotland yard, it's a violation of that act. we most frequently see that act being prosecuted with companies opening up plants or supply lines in third world countries and the brother of a prince or son-in-law of a queen gets a contract, basically a bribe, something that's prosecuted here mostly with large corporations doing things like that, but the facts do fit for news corp., if they bribed people at scotland yard to prosecute them in the u.s. >> how serious is the violation of a foreign practices act, something the sort of thing that could have more problems for a company? >> could have more problems, people could go to jail depending on how high you can show there was authorization to violate the act, but the corporation could be put into a monitorship for a period of time as we've seen with wall street companies over the years. they could actually make the company -- have the company lose its charter if they wanted to, but i'd like to move away from the criminal for a second, our federal communic
challenge question was a, operation weeting, the code name for scotland yard's hacking investigation. scotland yard has a book called "the book," and operations are randomly assigned code names from the book. go to our website for more. thanks for being part of my program this week. i will see you next week. >>> the headline-grabbing word scandal no longer captures what's happening to rupert murdoch's empire. targets as high as the prime minister and the queen and with one of his top lieutenants arrested in london today, this is a moment of reckoning for journalism. is there really any evidence of misconduct here in the u.s.? are murdoch's critics using this crisis as an excuse to vilify him. our guests include the editor of "the guardian." how much is the press being spun by the president and the republicans. i'm howard kurtz. this is "reliable sources." >>> the murdoch media empire is in all-out damage control mode as the scandal at the british papers continues to spread on this side of the atlantic, the fbi opened a preliminary investigation on whether phone hacking
that is to get the justice department to investigate. scotland yard is under investigation of several thousand names and phone numbers. i'm sure we could be talking to scotland yard and find out whether americans were part of that. >> politicians in the uk have been chastised to are their recent or i guess their past fears of rupert murdoch and not doing anything against the media baron in having so much control. do you think there would be more politicians having come forward to join you in the investigation or at least the intent of an investigation to find out what could be happening here? >> i would hope certainly those of us who represent the tristate area who lost so many citizens in new jersey, we lost about 00 citizens on that fateful day, so for us this is a question of great moment, this is a question of real concern. we have been working with these families over time. we have been seeking justice along the way, and so when bin laden was killed, there was a measurement of justice, but we've got to make sure that these families have their privacy and the sanctity of those moments for
rating. >>> elsewhere, scotland yard said it's made a seventh arrest in connection with the phone hacking scandal surrounding the "news of the world" tabloid. there are calls here in the united states for investigation of reports that victims of the september 11th attacks also were targeted. new york congressman peter king, chairman of the house homeland security committee, is weighing in. >> i am asking the fbi to investigate it, to find out what the facts are. now, a lot has come out about hacking. we have reports that they were hacking into phones after 9/11 and to 9/11 victims. and since so much else has come out, i think it's important that this be investigated and tracked down. if it turns out not to be true, then that's great. on the other hand, there's too much out there right now for this not to be investigated. >> the controversy led newscorp, parent company of "news of the world" to pull its bid for british sky broadcasting yesterday, and now there are questions about the future of the media empire built by rupert murdoch. nbc's stephanie gosk has more. >> order! order! >> repo
that scotland yard has made an arrest in the scandal that has rocked rupert murdoch's media empire and yet another remainor how serious the hacking investigation is. london's top police officer faces a public grilling today. dan rivers is on that for us. dan, what do you think? >> reporter: paul stevenson, the top policeman in the uk, is being questioned at the moment by the metropolitan police authority. particularly coming under pressure because, this morning, they arrested a former deputy editor i "the news of the world" neil wallace, arrest number nine as part of this and the other inquiry into corrupt or bribing police officials for information. now, the important thing is here is already we know one of the senior policemen in scotland yard john yates has already admitted having lunches with neil wallace, the man now arrested. a lot of pressure on one senior policeman, john yates, therefore, top pleasure on the top policemen. rupert and james murdoch are hounded in the people behind the building me to come and appear and justify what happened in their newspapers. james murdoch saying
of 2002, senior police officers at scotland yard met the now-chief executive of news international and informed her of serious action, and the new investigation will no doubt uncover why no action was taken within news international. news international and every other responsible paper should be not to publish on page 25 or 27, but on page one, apologies to all individuals. >> then, here in the united states, california senator barbara boxer and west virginia senator jay rockefeller called on eric holder and the squurt and exchange commissions to see if news corp. violated u.s. law ins bribing police officials to gain access to private telephone information and records. part of their letter reads "the reported allegations against news corporation are very serious, indicating a pattern of illegal activity and involve thousands of potential victims. it's important to ensure no united states laws were broken and no united states citizens were victimized." also letters urging holder to conduct an investigation and now new york congressman peter king is calling for an fbi investigation
kind of things happened here that happened over there. scotland yard made its ninth arrest in a widening scandal over in britain. how far will this go? joining us, u.s. senator barbara boxer from california. do you think the fbi should investigate the newscorp and rupert murdoch? >> absolutely and senator jay rockefeller, chairman of the committee of which i am a senior member, he joined me and we asked for an investigation by the department of justice and the security and exchange commission. listen, chris, there are two laws that really may be implicated here, that may have been broken here. one is the foreign corrupt practices act that passed in the '70s. one is the so-called wiretap act. and american corporations can't break american laws, and rupert murdoch, according to reports, became an american citizen. his corporation is american, because he wanted to be able to own tv stations. well, the fact is, you have to abide by american law. >> let me ask you, do you believe in he bribed foreign officials? isn't that what we're talking about? his corporation? >> well, it's
brought down rupert murdoch's "news of the world" paper. the top cop in london will testify about scotland yard's investigation today. >>> i want to be a fly on the wall during these ongoing debt talks. 20 days until the deadline on raising the debt ceiling. there's no deal yet. president obama reportedly told lawmakers, quote, this could bring my presidency down. talking about his promise to veto a short-term extension. he says he will not yield. they'll meet again today. the fifth session in as many days. the white house warns failing to raise the debt ceiling by august 2 send could trigger a partial default. >>> the power is slowly being restored in the chicago area after one of the worst storms on record. the storm packed wind gusts of nearly 80 miles an hour, knocking down trees and power lines. nearly 1 million customers were affected. this morning, the power company says more than 75% of its customers have had its power restored. >>> now the wakeup call for the shuttle "atlantis" crew. ♪ if you believed they put a man on the moon ♪ ♪ man on the moon ♪ if you believed >> good
are getting reports this morning scotland yards made an arrest in connection with the news corporation's phone hacking scandal. london's top cop is going to be in the hot seat today. let's bring in dan rivers. he has the latest live in london this morning. good morning, dan. >> reporter: good morning, yeah. another arrest this morning in this police inquiry. we understand that may be a former editor of "the news of the world." that's according to sky news here. he has been arrested this morning, taken into police custody. no comment from the news international themselves. the bigger picture here is there's still confusion about this request for the embamted chi chief. they are all being told to come and report to a committee here on tuesday. the deadline for them to respond is this morning. so far the committee had no response. this is pretty serious stuff. they can't force rupert and james murdoch to appear but they can force rebecca brooks to appear. if she continues to refuse to respond, issue a summons to her, they receiptcally they could send their security apparatus of the house behind m
paid to scotland yard officers by "news of the world" a violation of federal anti-bribery law. so, there's -- there's multiple fronts on which this is escalating for news corp., on top of the reports today that james murdoch may have to go back before parliament. >> and, mike, is any of this touching the media properties in the united states yet of the rupert murdoch empire, or is all this still stemming from the actions done with the uk media properties? >> well, certainly the computer hacking is an allegation involving a news corp. subsidiary in the united states, so that's the jurisdictional hook there. there's a problem there because it took place seven years ago, outside the statute of limitations, but if there is a pattern of conduct that could be established here, that would be the basis by which the feds could bring charges. but, you know, it's early yet. we got to be cautious. >> all right, mike isikoff, our national investigative correspondent, mike, thanks very much. >> thank you. >>> all right, once every decade, i've been promising you this for days, states redraw the
-ranking officers of scotland yard part of the original investigation in to news of the world were themselves victims of hacking. the allegations raising new questions about their handling of the case and they feared reprisals from the paper. the officers will appear at a hearing on that today. >>> wow. so have we heard -- have we heard any response from murdock's people? about these are overblown, they're not true? because you know what, again we've seen before where things are swept up. >> absolutely. especially in london. >> it's a storm, the london tabloids. and you sit there and go, i wonder if this is much to do about nothing down the road. but for the fact that i'm not really hearing a response from news corp. they're usually the most aggressive pitbulls. i mean, i always -- you look at their pr staff, they're remarkable. you sit there in wonderment. but they're completely silent. i'm thinking, wow, where there's smoke, there might be a lot of fire. >> they responded this morning to great britain. they responded by obviously the closure of the -- >> yeah, obviously. >> they responded.
session hours after another high profile member of scotland yard announced his resignation. several of the british papers reporters are accused of hacking into private cellphone accounts and bribing police officers for information. the newspaper was owned by news corp., the parent company of fox news. senior foreign affairs correspondent amy kellogg is live in london. what do we know today, amy. >> reporter: the phone hacking case is not just touching the top etc etchelon, but the police force. britain's two top cops resigning, the latest casualty john yates who was the assistant police commissioner, this resignation coming on the heels of the resignation of the commissioner himself yesterday amidst allegations that the original phone hacking investigation back in 2009 wasn't handled thoroughly or properly among other issues, and the police complaints commission has received four referrals about the conduct of different senior police officials in connection with this case. then rebecca brooks, until recently the head of rupert murdoch's british newspaper group arrested yesterday in
, working with its counterparts from scotland yard and the other authorities is basically monitoring their investigation to see whether or not news corp itself was involved in the allegations of the bribery. the fact that you have subsidiary companies of news corp doesn't necessarily mean that the executives themselves in fluz corp knew that this hacking was going on in london. >> other officials or a subsidiary of news corporation, that would be a skriem in tcrim sgliets. >> not necessarily. if those subsidiary companies are based in the uk, they're not going to necessarily be subject to the jurisdiction of the united states. news corp is traded on nasdaq so it's considered a u.s. corporation. if they were involved and knowledgeable of bribery of public officials in the uk, then that would be in violation of the foreign corrupt practices act. that's a felony that could be prosecuted here in the united states for that. >> very quickly because we've got to go, but you sort of wish you were still in the fbi to be investigating this kind of case? or would you just as soon let someone el
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)